Some observations from the field

I am a 66-year old who recently spent two weeks in Sikka Province, Flores, working as part of the NTA’s team monitoring the efficiency and effectiveness of its projects in that area.  I enjoyed the experience immensely. 

I accompanied my NTA colleagues, both Australian and Indonesian, and members of our partner organisation, the YPMF, in visits to farming communities (‘kelompoks’) to assess the NTA-assisted projects, ranging from the installation of water tanks and household toilets to the establishment of school libraries and the training of librarians, improved cocoa, coconut and vegetable farming, and production of ikat textiles. 

Each day we would spend about 7 or 8 hours talking to the representatives of farmers who have received assistance (and those who were seeking new funding), or school teachers, in around six different locations, negotiating some tricky roads but magnificent scenery in the process. 

 

Read more

Don’t speak again about traditional livestock farming

Kupang Post, 3/3/2014

A recent discussion on cattle development in NTT involving a Bank Indonesia delegation from NTT province and the Kupang Post showed Bank Indonesia and Kupang Post’s interest in supporting the resolve of the government that NTT become a Livestock Province.

Head of the Bank Indonesia delegation from NTT, Naek Tigor Sinaga, said NTT’s economic growth showed an increase of 5.55 per cent in 2013. 34.22 per cent of this comes from the farming sector, particularly horticulture and livestock.

Read more

Library Training in West Timor, January to June 2014

This program, which covers 35 small libraries established by the NTA in primary and secondary schools, is continuing in 2014. General training is being conducted in the most improved school libraries in the program, giving teachers the opportunity to learn from the best facilities. Then in May and June the library trainer Pak Frans, who is the Chief Librarian of the Catholic University in Kupang, will follow up with ‘individual’ training of teachers in the worst libraries.

Read more